Get in touch

+44 (0) 207 751 3333

mra@mediareach.co.uk

Mediareach Marketing Agency
Suite 11, 2 Station Court
Imperial Wharf
London
SW6 2PY
United Kingdom

General

Pinterest takes a leaf out of Shazam’s book with new feature ‘Lens’

Pinterest's Lens feature
Pinterest introduced an app last month that allows users to identify objects in the real world. The new feature, titled Lens, allows the Pinterest smartphone app to identify objects and thereafter, show you images and information about similar objects uploaded by other Pinterest users. The app functions almost as a kind of ‘Shazam’ for objects. Whether you point it at food, furniture or even the night sky, the Pinterest tool will use its machine vision to display objects that it believes are related.

In a demonstration for the feature, Pinterest co-founder Evan Sharp used Lens to detect a pomegranate. Pinterest returned results for pomegranate bread, pomegranate sandwiches, and tips for peeling pomegranates. Sharp also described an instance in which Lens was pointed towards the night sky. Pinterest in turn, brought up a selection of nigh-time landscape photos.

Why millennials may be struggling in the workplace

Why millennials may be struggling in the workplace
Millennials are struggling in the workplace and are being labelled by bosses as self-entitled, narcissistic, lazy and tough to manage, says motivational speaker and author Simon Sinek. Though Sinek believes to have discovered the reason behind this – “failed parenting strategies”.

After the success of his video on millennials in the workplace, Sinek spoke to The Independent and explained that the parenting style millennials have experienced, combined with social media, work environments and impatient tendencies, may be at fault for generation Y’s professional struggles. He suggests that the above factors have led to a generation plagued by low self-esteem. Sinek noted that whilst growing up, millennials became accustomed to receiving unwarranted praise from their parents. Subsequently he states that they have grown up with unrealistic expectations and face shock when entering the real world as their self-images are shattered.

Millennials are less mobile than previous generations

Millennials are less mobile than previous generations

According to analysis by the Pew Research Center, only 20 percent of 25 to 35 year olds reported a change of address in 2016, compared to 26 percent of Gen Xers in 2000. Meanwhile, in 1990 27 percent reported to have moved homes in the year prior.

Subsequently, today’s young Americans have been revealed to be less mobile than the previous four generations were at the same age, with the trend underscoring a pattern across all demographic groups. The research revealed that the overall share of Americans of all ages who moved homes in the previous year fell to an all-time low of 11.2% in 2016, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.

Economists are concerned by the trend as moving has previously been linked to the pursuit of job opportunities and with the economy improving, they would expect Americans to be moving in greater numbers. Millennials in particular, would be expected to be mobile since they are less likely to be tied down by three of the things that tend to hinder people from moving – a spouse, a house, or a child.

250,000 UK admin jobs will be taken over by robots by 2030

Robots in UK
A Think tank Reform report has revealed that 248,860 public sector jobs could be taken over by AI (artificial intelligence) and automated systems over the next 15 years.

According to Think tank Reform, administrator jobs within the UK’s civil service and public sector may be automated to improve efficiency. The report is based on interviews, data, previous research and Freedom of Information requests, and estimates the changes could save the UK £4bn per year through the reduction of the public sector’s wage bill.

Think tank Reform claims the headcount of the government, police and NHS could be significantly reduced and 24,000 roles in frontline healthcare could be replaced. A Reform representative even stated that “public services could become the next Uber” with the gig economy encouraging further employment of locum doctors and supply teachers.

The report stresses that workforces within public services have been designed to be too hierarchical and “unresponsive to user needs” hence it would be beneficial to replace humans with online processes to complete tasks. One example cited by the report wherein we have already seen this shift is the HMRC which has reduced its admin staff from 96,000 to 60,000 over the last ten years.

Mediareach took part in Dragons Den at Tech City Stars Reboot Camp

Mediareach took part in Dragons Den at Tech City Stars Reboot Camp

Our CEO, Saad Saraf, was part of a Dragon’s Den style panel discussion this week in association with Tech City Stars Reboot Camp. Reboot Camp is a pre-apprenticeship program targeted towards young adults as a means to help them gain skills in Mobile App Development, Interactive Media & Marketing and Pre-Employment Skills.

The event, a variation on the Dragons Den TV show, was an opportunity for the apprentices to pitch their tech business ideas to a panel of potential clients. These included Mediarearch Advertising CEO Saad Saraf, Joana Condeco from Brilliant Basics, James Herbertson from London Nest and a representative from Sphonic.

The young tech stars showcased their presentations on mobile app ideas tackling gaps in the market.

The proposed apps focused on IT solutions and computer repairs, converting teachers notes into word documents, football participation, music composition, task assignments and many other concepts.

How To Target A “Smart Traveller”

  Travellers now are informed, empowered and connected which has some impact on the industry. Nowadays it is all about understanding customers and interpreting their needs correctly in order to deliver personalized and excellent experience. Understanding the changing media landscape is key. Insights coupled with creative...

The Story of the BBC (that’s short for British Born Chinese)

British Born Chinese Timeline

The chinese community continues to rapidly grow in the UK, here’s a little timeline about how it all began…

It all kicked off way back in the 17th Century when the UK carried out naval trade with China and Chinese sailors first established residence in London.

And then in the 19th Century the Chinese communities began to expand in other port cities such as Liverpool and Cardiff.

The 1950’s saw the opening of a number of family-run Chinese restaurants and takeaways and with the invention of washing machines, many of the first Chinese settlers set up laundries.